Advent Knitting

Last year I made an offhand comment on Facebook about the Opal Advent Calendar. Much to my surprise and delight my aunt bought me one for Christmas. It was so much fun opening the little windows to see the pretty new yarn each day. I loved advent calendars as a child, but mine pre-dated the chocolate variety (or any other type of gift) and only had little pictures inside. Yarn definitely beats pictures and sometimes (but not always) chocolate.*

 

 

By Christmas I was left with 24 mini balls of sock yarn and some questions about what I would do with them.

 

My anal knitter side wouldn’t let me make mis-matched socks. I find Opal slightly scratchy so I didn’t want to make a shawl or scarf. My back up plan was squares for my sock yarn blanket, but that didn’t seem quite right either. Then I stumbled across a pattern for Christmas ornaments knit from small amounts of sock yarn. Perfect!

 

There are two varieties: spiral:

 

And chevron:

 

Chevron is my favourite of the two. I had trouble with the spiral pattern that was completely related to my inability to count and completely unrelated to the pattern, but it’s finally working out.

 

Because I remain totally, hopelessly delusional about the amount of free time I have leading up the Christmas holidays and totally, hopelessly delusional about the speed at which I knit, I thought it would be fun to knit an ornament a day, sort of a reverse advent calendar. So far so good, but I’m traveling for work this week and I’m pretty sure things are about to go off the rails. I’m posting a picture a day (hopefully) on Instagram, so please follow along there.

 

* I’ve never really thought of yarn vs. chocolate. That’s a debate I’m not ready to have.

My Knit East 2017

Every other fall I look forward to attending Knit East. This biennial event is hosted by Cricket Cove in St. Andrews, NB. It’s 2 days of knitting, yarn, and learning in a gorgeous hotel only a couple hours from home. It’s about as good as it gets.

 

Knit East 2017 was held in late October, right at the peak of fall foliage in Southern New Brunswick. Two of my classes were held in the Rotunda; which reminds me a lot of a sunporch. With views like this, it doesn’t really matter what you call it.

View from my seat at this morning’s class. #KnitEast #KnitEast2017 #ExploreNB #TwoNationVacation

A post shared by Bonnie Morse (@bhmorse) on

 

Continue reading “My Knit East 2017”

The Brown Sweater

In some ways it seems like forever and in others ways it’s like it was last summer that I took a pottery class with my mother and sister. I ended up making buttons there and to say they were “rustic” is a bit of an upgrade:

Nevertheless, I was proud of my accomplishment (and felt a bit like a third grader who made a lopsided ashtray in art class) and was determined I would knit something to actually use them. I knew had to be a substantial pattern to hold up (literally and figuratively) those buttons. No wimpy fingering weight would do here. To complicate things, I’ve knit 2 sweaters in my life: one over a decade ago and the other was a baby sweater. No matter, I could do this. I settled on the Annabel, an Aran weight sweater in garter stitch which should in theory result in a “quick knit”.

 

I settled into knitting. And I knit. And knit. I wrote a poem about knitting. And knit. And then, like many knitters, I grew bored and tossed it in a corner. Not forgotten as much as I might try.

 

Finally a few weeks ago I decided one way or another I was going to finish it. I as a little annoyed with myself: I only had half of an arm to do. (Really, that’s when I chose to quit?!?)

 

I finished sewing the buttons on this week. I had some mixed emotions; I can point out immeasurable mistakes. Most notably I’ve always had issues with sleeves being too long (I blame short arms for my lack of selfie prowess). Apparently this completely left my brain as the sleeves would probably work for a seven foot basketball player. I’ve decided that the rolled up sleeves are a design feature.

 

 

In the end, it’s not a great complicated knitting accomplishment but it’s not bad for a third sweater. It’s a cozy, squishy knit for a chilly fall day (I’m sure we’ll have one of those eventually).

 

“Everyone Gets a Dishcloth!”

I knew I’d been on a bit of a dishcloth knitting kick the last few weeks but I didn’t realize exactly how much I’d gone to my go-to mindless knitting:

Looks like everyone will be getting a dishcloth this Christmas.

 

(There may be another 3 in various stages of completion strategically stashed in various locations. Don’t judge.)

 

~~

Pattern: Gaterlac Dishcloth

Yarn: Knit Picks Dishie; Hobby Lobby I Love this Cotton; Pisgah Peaches & Creme;Β (and I can’t remember what the blue/green/yellow/white was)

The Saddest Weiner Dog Ever

I have this love-hate relationship with knit toys. I love the end result, but they all seem to involve my least favourite part of knitting – sewing. For some reason I had this crazy idea that if I knit a toy as a flat square it would be more fun to assemble. Actually, it was more on the lines of: “a square is easy to knit. I’ll worry about the details later”. If I had a nickel every time I thought the last part of the that thought…

 

Anyway, I got to this stage:

 

…thought “WHAT was I thinking!” (again, if I had a nickel) and settled down with the instructions to figure it out.

 

The put together involved counting, and apparently also had some dependence on knitting the exact number of rows, not just knitting til it sort of looked like a square. As I got putting it together, I kept thinking:

 

“My that head looks small.”

 

I did the next couple of instructions, assuring myself it was one of those mysteries of the universe that would suddenly make sense when it was done.

 

It didn’t; the head still looks small.

 

Continue reading “The Saddest Weiner Dog Ever”

I Knit Where I Want

A few weeks ago during the hockey playoffs Twitter was a twitter when this photo started making the rounds:

Not being a hockey fan, I stumbled across it inadvertently when someone I follow (an avid Pittsburg fan) tweeted about her.

I’ve written before about the challenges of knitting in public, particularly at work. She fell into a hole I’ve carefully tried to avoid: people thinking that you were not engaged while holding needles and yarn. Clearly it’s easier to make that connection in person as opposed to a nationally televised sporting event.

 

While there have been many traditional media articles written since the initial tweet, what has struck me is how she has responded on Twitter. Β It is a lesson in how social media allows people to voice their response immediately in conjunction with more in depth coverage from traditional media. While both have their roles in telling the story, I believe that without her quick and informed responses, the initial reaction of the twitter post might have also been the tone of the traditional media stories. Instead she has articulately made her case that because you are knitting doesn’t mean you are not paying attention.

 

At a time when news stories are questioned on a daily basis, it is an interesting lesson on how you can control your own narrative.